By May 26, 2017 Read More →

Understanding What a “Piggyback” Mortgage Loan Is and How It Works

Understanding What a As a potential homebuyer who is new to the market, many of the terms and mortgage products available to you can be more than a little confusing. Piggyback loans might be a little less familiar than many other options, but if you’re ready to jump into the housing market this type of mortgage can be useful for you. If you’re hoping to invest in a home sooner rather than later, here are the details on this type of loan.

What’s A Piggyback Loan?

While most mortgage loans require one loan and one lender, a piggyback loan is used for homebuyers who don’t have 20% to put down but want to avoid private mortgage insurance (PMI). Because a mortgage with less than 20% down will require the homebuyer to pay PMI, a piggyback loan can assist in avoiding this. For example, in the event that the homebuyer is putting down 10%, their primary mortgage will cover 80% of the purchase price while the piggyback loan will cover the remaining 10%.

What Are The Requirements?

Since there have been many issues with piggyback loans in the past, there are more requirements for this type of loan than there used to be. While it varies from lender to lender, most homebuyers will be expected to put down at least 10% in order to qualify for this loan. In addition, they will be required to have a good credit score to ensure they are a good risk. While the debt-to-income ratio will fluctuate from lender to lender, potential homebuyers will have to prove that they can make their monthly payments.

Is This Loan Right For You?

It’s important before deciding on a piggyback loan that it’s the right choice for you. Since a piggyback loan will require you to pay down two different loans, it means that you will not be able to tap into your home equity in the event that you want to free up funds. It can also put home ownership in harm’s way if there are any financial setbacks. As well, while PMI can be canceled after the equity in your home is at 20%, a piggyback loan does not provide this option.

A piggyback mortgage can be a good option for homeowners who want to get into the market, but it’s important to determine if it’s a financially solid choice before wading in. If you’re currently getting prepared to buy, contact your trusted mortgage professionals for more information.

Posted in: Home Mortgage Tips

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